3 December 2019

3 Writing Feedback Examples That Produce High-Performing Content [VIDEO]

“This doesn’t work, please fix.” Ugh. Of all the writing feedback examples, this one really takes the cake. We’ve all been on the receiving end of feedback that just isn’t helpful. All good writers aim to produce content that needs minimal fixes, but they can only do that if they know what their client is looking for. 


Video transcript

Hi SaaS marketers! Emily Amos here from Uplift Content.

“This doesn’t work, please fix.” Ugh. Of all the writing feedback examples, this one really takes the cake. We’ve all been on the receiving end of feedback that just isn’t helpful. All good writers aim to produce content that needs minimal fixes, but they can only do that if they know what their client is looking for. 

You already know that working with a B2B SaaS content writer can be a lifesaver when you’re slammed with projects. A surefire way to fast-track their success is by providing clear, helpful feedback on their work. 

This is a win-win because it strengthens the quality of your content and will save you time as your writer gains a better understanding of your business. Today, I’m going to give you a few writing feedback examples to ensure you get great B2B SaaS marketing content from your writer—with less hand-holding. 


Writing feedback examples

Example #1: Organize your feedback by theme

Keep your writing feedback clean and organized. The more marked up and cluttered a document gets, the more likely it is your writer may miss a piece of feedback. Rather than noting every single instance of an error or area for improvement, address these issues as themes.

For example, if your writer has used incorrect punctuation in a few places, you can make one comment that says, “Please comb through this document again to remove any Oxford commas.” This can also apply if your writer has started several sentences in passive voice or if they’ve used a particular formatting style that isn’t working well. 

This writing feedback example is worth the effort because it will prompt your writer to read their work carefully before submitting their next draft. This will save you time, too.

Example #2: Deliver positive and negative feedback separately

It’s important to provide writing feedback on both the things that worked in the content and the things that didn’t. That said, you should keep these types of feedback separate.

For example, don’t comment, “I really like how you told the story in this case study, but the quotes you used fell flat.” This is confusing because it’s not clear what worked in the story. Instead, you can say, “I really like how you told the story in this case study—it flows well because the sentences are concise and the language is interesting.” Then in a separate comment, ask, “Could you edit the quotes so they speak more directly to the impact the customer got from the solution?”

This writing feedback example is worth your time because the more clarity your B2B SaaS writer has on how they can improve, the faster they can take action to deliver marketing content that converts.

Example #3: Ask questions that lead the writer where you want them to go

Another way you can help hone your writer’s skills is by giving them feedback that’s clear on the direction you want them to go in, rather than simply rewriting their copy yourself.

For example, instead of taking the proverbial red pen to your B2B SaaS writer’s work, you can ask, “Do you think this paragraph could be more engaging with more active language?”. A good writer will revisit the text and make it more dynamic. You could also ask, “Do you think this quote explains the point clearly, or could it be paraphrased?”.

This writing feedback example will help build your writer’s skills in a way that gets them to do the thinking themselves. They’ll become more familiar with your preferences and will be better equipped to get you the results you’re looking for.

To recap

We just went through 3 writing feedback examples to help drive high-performing marketing content in your business. Remember to organize your feedback by theme, deliver positive and negative feedback separately, and ask questions that lead your writer where you want them to go.

Learn more about building a relationship with your external writer and how to onboard your content writer.

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Emily Amos
Emily Amos

As the founder of Uplift Content, Emily leads teams in creating done-for-you case studies, ebooks and white papers for high-growth SaaS companies. Check out her bio.

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